7 Ways to Control Tartar Buildup

Bacteria inside the mouth, when mixed with proteins and food debris, develop into plaque. Regular plaque removal can prevent the development of tooth decay, gum disease, and other dental problems. However, if plaque is not removed, it hardens into tartar, which can only be removed by a dental hygienist or a dentist.

Here are effective ways to control the development of tartar buildup in your mouth:

Brush your teeth regularly

brushing teeth

Make sure that you do the tooth brushing in a thorough manner, taking the time to clean all of your teeth. Spending an average of two minutes every time you brush your teeth will give you enough time to clean even the back teeth.

Choose the right toothbrush

toothbrush

Use a toothbrush with a small head so that it can reach even the back area of your mouth. Soft bristles will be able to effectively clean areas between the teeth and the gum line. If you can, go for a powered or electric toothbrush, which studies show are better-equipped to remove plaque compared to manual toothbrushes.

Use tartar-control toothpaste with fluoride

fluoride

Tartar-control toothpaste can prevent dental plaque from hardening into tartar. The fluoride provides additional protection by repairing small existing damage to the tooth enamel.

Floss regularly

dental floss

Using dental floss removes plaque buildup in between the teeth and the gum line, and other areas that cannot be reached and cleaned by tooth brushing.

Limit sugar and starch intake

ice cream

The acid in sugary and starchy food items can be harmful when they are exposed to the mouth’s natural bacteria. Limiting the consumption of these food items can prevent the buildup of dental plaque.

Drink plenty of water

water hydrate

Drinking plenty of water flushes away food debris inside your mouth so they are not in contact with your teeth (and mouth bacteria) for a long period of time.

Stop smoking

smoking stop

According to studies, those who use tobacco or cigarettes have a higher risk of developing tartar, compared to individuals who do not smoke.